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Logan County Hospital – Great Spot for a Creepy Hotel or Apartment Building

Class: •Hospital

Location Data

Year Built:1925
Year Abandoned: 1978
City: •Guthrie
Photographer:AbandonedOK Team

The Methodist Episcopal Conference began construction on the building in 1925. A Guthrie nonprofit organization purchased the hospital in 1932 and named it Cimarron Valley Wesley Hospital.

In 1946, the Order of the Sisters of Benedict purchased the hospital and completed construction soon afterward.

St. Anthony Hospital , owned and operated by the Sisters of St. Francis of Maryville, Mo., bought the facility in 1964, renaming it Alvero Heights Hospital .

The name was changed to Logan County Memorial Hospital in 1974.

The hospital was deeded to the county in 1977 and a replacement facility opened west of Guthrie in October, 1978.

In 1982, R&T Properties, a partnership of local businessmen Ray H. Riddle and Hal A. Treadwell, purchased the former Logan County Memorial Hospital and its four acres for an undisclosed price from the Logan County Hospital Trust Authority.

The five-story, 55,000-square-foot building, located at 19th and W Warner in Guthrie, was supposed to be remodeled into 50 to 70 one-bedroom and two-bedroom apartments but the project never got off the ground. Although, the building is said to be haunted, many moves were made to try and turn it into an apartment building without success. Although it looks more like it would be fit for a haunted Paris hotel direct from a movie than a place of living. Many people have claimed to see apparitions in the hospital’s windows. People have had other eerie experiences when they’ve gone adventuring into the building as well. Just like something out of movie set in hotels in London, lights have been know to flicker on and off making for one scary tour.

The OKCPRG-PPRG have been doing research on the property for over 10 years now, covering the entire facility with cameras that have caught numerous bits of evidence over the years. You can read all about their great project at the OKCPRG-PPRG Website.

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